Research

Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) and neurofeedback systems are experiencing a context swap. Primarily used by medical research to help handicapped persons they now arouse a great deal of interest by the entertainment industry to engage non-handicapped. The project Ride Your Mind (RYM) links neuroscientific approaches with digital media art and experimental game design.

RYM is a concept for an artistic virtual reality game generated by neurofeedback using an Oculus Rift head-mounted display (HMD) or similar device to compute a playable visualisation of neurological signals collected by an Emotiv EEG BCI. This data will be processed using Unity3D, a 3D game engine software and interface manager well-suited for the desired playable data visualisation.

The Concept of RYM is based on a playful strategy for designing artistic games that is extracted from the history of hacking. Early hacks consisted of artistic and gameful content like algorithmic visualisations and interactive programs: that is, games. Hackers transformed computers from military devices to entertainment devices, which can be defined as the cradle of digital games and digital media art as well.

Interests

  • Playful Hacking & Gamification of Innovation
  • Visionary Thinking & Creative Thinking
  • Playful Interaction with emerging Technologies
  • Digital Game Art & Media Art
  • Neurogaming & Neuroscience
  • Virtual Reality & Augmented Reality
  • Experimental Game Design
  • Experimental Entertainment

Research Projects

  • Ride Your Mind (RYM)

    Ride Your Mind (RYM)

    Ride Your Mind (RYM) is an interactive, hackish, neurofeedback real-time virtual reality game art installation or, in brief, an artistic and experimental NeuroVR game that forces the user’s conscious to compete with his subconscious.

    The aim of RYM is to imbue the player with an awareness of his own brain as a consciously controllable tool comparable, for example, to his hand. It achieves this aim by forcing the player’s conscious acting into competition with his subconscious acting; the player receives direct neuronal feedback showing him his unconscious brain activity, eliciting a whole new sensation of self.

    The RYM concept does not ignore the fact that the game experience is a highly intimate one in which personal sensory data is temporarily stored and processed. If the user does allow the data collected to be stored or even anonymously shared, it can be interpreted by medical experts and thereby serve as a contribution to cognitive neurological research. Running a game generated by neurological data in real time requires knowledge gleaned from medical research. In other words, the game itself entails a recontextualisation of medical knowledge into a gaming and art context. Just as hackers transformed military devices into entertainment devices, RYM uses knowledge and devices from the medical world to create an artistic and experimental form of entertainment.

    This artistic virtual reality game generated by neurofeedback using an Oculus Rift head-mounted display (HMD) to display a playable stereoscopic 3D visualisation of neurological signals collected by an Emotiv EEG Brain Computer Interface (BCI). The data will be processed using Unity3D, a 3D game engine software and interface manager well-suited for the desired playable data visualisation.

    rym_concept_up

  • Hacking as a Playful Strategy for Designing Artistic Games

    Hacking as a Playful Strategy for Designing Artistic Games

    Hacking is an ambiguous term. Over the past 50 years, its meaning has been constantly expanded and refined, filtered through several disciplines from divergent fields of application such as, for example, technology, computers, media, art, design, games and more.

    Hacking is an ambiguous term. Over the past 50 years, its meaning has been constantly expanded and refined, filtered through several disciplines from divergent fields of application such as, for example, technology, computers, media, art, design, games and more. First used to describe a playful strategy employed to solve a problem, the term hacking now connotes an illicit behaviour in cyberspace. Today, the common perception is that hackers are rule-breakers and system-intruders who seek to do damage or even commit acts of war. In truth, hackers helped transform computers from military devices to entertainment devices. Early hacks consisted of artistic and gameful content such as algorithmic visualisations and interactive programs: that is, games. We can think of this context swap (military to entertainment) to be the cradle of digital games and digital art.